Nation’s Largest Latino Organization Backs Puerto Rico Statehood Choice Legislation

A letter from the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) to all members of the U.S. House of Representatives July 23rd urged support for the bill to commit the Federal government to act on statehood for Puerto Rico if islanders vote for the status again.

The letter signed by President Margaret Moran noted that Puerto Ricans rejected the current territory status and chose statehood among the alternatives in a plebiscite last November:

On November 6, 2012, the 3.7 million American citizens living in Puerto Rico exercised their right to self-determination by holding a free and fair vote on the U.S. territory’s future political status.  The results showed that a clear majority of Puerto Rico voters do not support the current territory status, and that more voters favor statehood than any other status option, including the current status.

The letter also stated that:

It is a sad but undeniable fact that the people of Puerto Rico, despite being citizens of the greatest democracy in history, have a political status that is undemocratic and unequal.  For both moral and legal reasons, it is incumbent upon the federal government to facilitate Puerto Rico’s transition to a democratic and dignified status.  Because H.R. 2000 establishes a fair, straightforward and transparent process that responds to the historic results of the November referendum, it has LULAC’s strong endorsement.

HR 2000, which is supported by 101 members of the House led by Puerto Rico’s representative to the Federal government, Pedro Pierluisi, would require the President to submit legislation to make the territory a State if Puerto Ricans vote for statehood again. It would also pledge Congress to pass such legislation.

In addition to its actual sponsors, the Puerto Rico Status Resolution Act has 1,290 “citizen cosponsors” on House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s  Cosponsor.gov, where it remains the most popular bill.

LULAC is the largest and the oldest Hispanic organization in the United States. Civic participation and civil rights are among its highest priorities.

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Bernardino Surita Troche

As I have stated, Puerto Rican here on state side for more then 2 years should not have a say on the Island future political status. We are here because our parent brought us here or on our own, But I would like to Add that after living in the states for 60 years has not been any different then if my mother would have Stay in P.R. On a trip to PR one year with my sister & wife I had ask my sister now that you have seen PR for the pass 3 week stay would you have Rather stay here in the island or leave it….Too my surprise she said…I would have stay in the island knowing what I have gone through in the states…She was in her 20’s when she left the Island she was in her late 70’S when I ask her the question on living in PR and even though I was 8 years old we I got to the states,I also would have love to stay in Puerto Rico…Their is too much Indifference here in the states even though we are American Citizens it does not change a thing….Even today people would ask me what kind of currency does Puerto Rico use for money,. One of many stories that I have gone through for the pass 60 years.

John

I appreciate LULAC’s push to let Congress do it’s job. What are your personal thoughts on accepting HR2000 vs the “new/enhanced Commonwealth” idea that Garcia Padilla is pushing for?

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